Know These Rules Before Rolling Out Your Telephone Marketing Strategy

Organizations these days rely heavily on telemarketing calls and other telephone marketing strategies for generating leads. Effective telephone marketing services can connect prospective customers to the products or services that companies offer in a simple and cost-effective manner. In telemarketing, unlike the traditional method, sales representatives don’t have to visit the customers’ place, which is both time-consuming and inconvenient. This post primarily focuses on some of the key rules that companies should comply with to make sure they don’t get into legal tangles:

When Making Live Calls
Companies are prohibited from making unsolicited calls to the following parties:Telephone Lists

  • People who are not interested in receiving calls from any marketing firm and have registered with DND in this regard.
  • Companies can’t call at the numbers registered with the TPS or CTPS unless the owner/user of that number has give clear consent in receiving calls from them. The rule applies even in case the sales team wants to get in touch with an existing customer.

Apart from following the above rules while making live marketing calls, telemarketers should also not forget to introduce themselves, and mention the company’s full address and a valid contact number before pitching their products or services.

Related: Are You Making These Mistakes in Your Telemarketing Campaigns?

Rules for Making Automated Calls
Companies should avoid making automated calls that play recorded messages to anyone except those, who have provided clear consent on receiving such calls from the marketing firms. Getting a general/indirect consent that doesn’t specify automated calls allow a company to make live marketing calls to an individual. To avoid legal troubles, companies should request customers who’re interested in receiving marketing calls to provide their consent in written (e.g. by filling out forms/ticking the opt-in box, clearly specifying that they’re interested in receiving calls from the company).

TPS and CTPS Explained
Both Telephone Preference Service (TPS) and Corporate Telephone Preference Service (CTPS) are registers of individuals and corporations that don’t want to receive telemarketing calls. TPS as well as CTPS serve the same purpose with the only exception that while TPS is a list that includes individuals that have opted out of receiving telesales calls whereas CTPS comprises a list of corporates that are unwilling to receive sales calls. Companies should avoid calling the individuals or companies in these lists unless they have given consent in receiving calls.

Who Telemarketing Companies Can Call?
You can call any individual or company that has expressed interest in receiving promotional calls. Individuals and companies that are not registered with TPS and CTPS can also be called. It is advisable that you refer to the TPS as well as the CTPS list before calling corporates as some companies enlist with the former while others register themselves with the latter. Also, the TSR (Telemarketing Sales Rule) prohibits companies from making sales calls between 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. You should, therefore, avoid calling your customers/prospects during this period.

Make the best of your phone list
Make sure to follow the above rules while implementing your telephone marketing strategies and making the optimum use of the phone list available to you. It is also imperative that you avoid calling individuals, who have provided indirect consent through third parties. Even in case you have secured a direct consent, make sure that it is valid and covers the marketing services your business claims to offer.

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